Woman Attacked, Bitten By Coyote in Orangeburg

Coyote shot, killed by police 

BY BILL DEMAREST

UPDATETests have shown that the coyote that attacked an Orangeburg woman Tuesday morning had rabies, according to Orangetown police. Police are advising that anyone who thinks they may have come in contact with the coyote should contact their doctor. Additionally, police urge anyone who thinks a pet might have come in contact with the coyote should contact their veterinarian.

Coyote in Orangeburg Attack Test Positive for Rabies

Police: People who contact with animal should seek medical attention

ORANGEBURG – Tests have shown that a coyote that attacked an Orangeburg woman Tuesday morning had rabies, according to Orangetown police.

Police are advising that anyone who thinks they may have come in contact with the coyote should contact their doctor. Additionally, police urge anyone who thinks a pet might have come in contact with the coyote should contact their veterinarian.

Det. Lt. James Brown said the Rockland County Health Department notified police today that tests done by a state lab showed the coyote involved in Tuesday’s attack on Greywood Drive was found to have rabies. The animal attacked a 52-year-old Greywood Drive woman just before 7 a.m. as she was walking her dog.

The woman sustained injuries on a leg and an arm and she was treated at Nyack Hospital. Her dog was not injured.

Town police urge residents not to approach any wild animal. Additionally, police said residents who spot any wildlife that appears ill or to be acting strangely should call police. In Orangetown, the number is 845-359-3700.

In the Orangeburg incident, police believe the sick coyote was initially spotted on Monday evening. At that time, police sent out an automated phone message warning residents of the area about the coyote.

Stock image of a coyote
Stock image of a coyote

ORANGEBURG – A 52-year-old Orangeburg woman who was walking her dog Tuesday morning was attacked and bitted by a coyote, according to Orangetown police.

The coyote was shot and killed by a town police officer and the animal was taken to the Rockland County Medical Examiner’s Office, where it was being prepared to be shipped to the State Police laboratory in Albany for rabies testing. Police said the woman was walking her dog on Greywood Drive in Orangeburg at about 6:57 a.m. when the coyote approached her and attacked. The was was bitten by the coyote on her left leg, causing a puncture wound.

The coyote, according to the victim, seemed more focused on her and not her dog. The dog was not injured.

Police said the victim took her jacket off while the coyote was attacking and used it as a shield. The woman was able to run into neighbor’s home to take refuge. The coyote ran into a backyard, where a town police officer shot the animal.

The victim was treated by members of Rockland Paramedics and was taken by member of South Orangetown Ambulance Corps to Nyack Hospital for treatment. The Orangetown animal control unit took the body of the coyote to the Medical Examiner’s Office. Police said the head of the animal will be used for testing.

Orangetown police say they expect to know by Thursday afternoon the results of rabies tests on the remains of a coyote that attacked the woman. Police said the animal is believed to be the same one that was spotted on Greywood Drive around 6 p.m. on Monday. At that time, police were alerted to the coyote by local residents and they town officers saw the animal, but it went off into the woods on its own and did not threatened anyone.

Orangetown police sent out an automated phone message to residents in the area, warning them of the coyote spotting. Police believe the animal was a fairly young coyote.

The woman who was attacked was bitten hard enough to break the skin, but police said the would was not severe. The rabies testing being done by the State Police lab in Albany is a safeguard so medical officials can determine whether the victim would need additional treatment to protect against rabies.

Originally published by Nyack Free Press. Republished with permission