Rockland County welcomes new bank into fold

Putnam Savings Bank opens first Rockland branch in New City

BY KATHY KAHN

Joseph D. Roberto, President/CEO of Putnam County Savings Bank (center) cuts the ribbon on the bank’s new Rockland branch on North Main Street. Joining him (front row, left to right) are Al Samuels, President, Rockland Business Association; Irene Botschagow, Head Teller; Julie Prevost, Branch Manager; Karl Thimm, PCSB Trustee; Richard Weiss, PCSB Trustee; Roger Schreiber, RBA, Vice President of Development; along with other members of the bank and the business community joining in the celebration.
Joseph D. Roberto, President/CEO of Putnam County Savings Bank (center) cuts the ribbon on the bank’s new Rockland branch on North Main Street. Joining him (front row, left to right) are Al Samuels, President, Rockland Business Association; Irene Botschagow, Head Teller; Julie Prevost, Branch Manager; Karl Thimm, PCSB Trustee; Richard Weiss, PCSB Trustee; Roger Schreiber, RBA, Vice President of Development; along with other members of the bank and the business community joining in the celebration.

Putnam County Savings Bank welcomed its board members of Rockland’s business community at its ribbon cutting in its newest branch on Monday, November 18 —its first in the county.

“This is our 10th branch,” said Robert Farrier, senior vice president and branch administrator. “We have three branches in Putnam, three in Dutchess and three in Westchester. It made sense for us to expand our community platform in a growing marketplace and make the bank’s debut in the county seat.”

Putnam County Savings Bank was established in Brewster in 1871 and is a full service bank, serving both residential and commercial customers. With more than $900 million in assets, the mutual bank is focused on staying local.

“We like being part of a community and having local decision makers to work with our customers,” said Farrier. No doubt more of Putnam County Savings Bank’s logo will be sprouting up in the future as Rockland continues to grow its commercial cachet, bouncing back from the throes of the Great Recession.