RCT SPECIAL REPORT: MISSLE, SPACE, INTELLIGENCE CENTER – Future of Warfare

By:  Anthony Melé, RCT Contributor

U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin R. Reynolds GTR-18 surface-to-air missile simulators are fired at incoming aircraft during nighttime warfare training at the Yodaville close air support range near Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Ariz., April 11, 2011. The Defense Intelligence Agency’s Missile and Space Intelligence Center helps to protect U.S. forces from similar real weapons.

U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Benjamin R. Reynolds

GTR-18 surface-to-air missile simulators are fired at incoming aircraft during nighttime warfare training at the Yodaville close air support range near Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Ariz., April 11, 2011. The Defense Intelligence Agency’s Missile and Space Intelligence Center helps to protect U.S. forces from similar real weapons.

 

In a world where the battle-field can extend over continents with Inter-Continental Ballistic Missiles [ICBMs] to shoulder fired anti air craft weapons; the mission of the Missile, Space, Intelligence Center [MSIC] at Redstone Arsenal in Alabama is to prepare our war fighters for just such a fight.

“The work itself is pretty detailed and geeky,” MSIC Director Pamela McCue explained during an interview with American Forces Press Service. “We’re a bunch of engineers and scientists, and by nature we love to figure out how things work.”

At the height of the Cold War, US intelligence services were acquiring foreign weapons from the former Soviet Union, buying up everything from MIG fighter jets to T-72 Battle Tanks by means of special black operations through a network of international arms dealers and slight of hand.

These types of acquisitions were then handed over to engineers at MSIC, who reverse engineer or technology transfer it, so our war-fighters learn how to defeat it.

“MSIC engineers and scientists focus on how a weapon works, how well it works, and how it’s vulnerable or how it can be defeated, she said. Air and missile defense is a key mission.

“These are surface-to-air missiles primarily that fire at our aircraft, so anywhere that we have an air operation going, we are likely to face these kinds of systems,” McCue noted.

The missiles range from air defense systems that a person can carry and fire from the shoulder to long-range air defense systems that can engage targets over hundreds of miles. The director said millions of “man-portable” systems are in use around the world.”

In the face of saber rattling between the Obama Administration and North Koreas leader, the prospect of missile defense war-fare requires preparation.

Most especially, since military engagement against the North Koreans will invariably pull in China, as it did during the Korean War in 1951.

The prospect of open warfare with North Korea and China will engage not only land forces, but air and sea battles, that could quickly devolve into a nuclear exchange.

The technologies needed to fight a sustained battle in these prospective scenarios will involve high tech weaponry, which will include lasers, particle beams, electromagnetic pulse devices, and satellite killers.

McCue added; “Another important area for MSIC includes ground-based weapons that fire missiles or directed energy at platforms in space. These include anti-satellite missiles and directed-energy weapons.”

Military analysts have warned us that the greatest national security threat is a weak US economy.  The staggering amount of money it would take to fight a conventional air, land, sea, and space battle against Korea, which will likely draw in a nuclear power China, will make the use of high tech weapons a necessity.

Diplomacy is highly effective when supported by a vibrant economy and military supremacy in the air, land, sea, space battle-fields.  Peace is achieved when your enemies no longer have the ability or the sustainability to wage war on you.

In the absence of effective diplomacy, a failing economy and limited military capability, coupled with indecisive political leadership, the ingredients for blundering into a world war increase.

The North Korean bluster according to a consensus of global intelligence analyst is mostly for domestic consumption, to assert his leadership posture over his military generals, and to gain some type of diplomatic concession from the West in the form of a subsidy or other pacifier.

A miscalculation on either side, could blunder the world into a scenario of unthinkable consequences.  Provocations like troop movements, naval exercises, fighter jet sorties, or bombers like the F-117 Stealth deployed to the region, could be misread as a hegemonic display of military might that invites an equally ill-advised response.

Russian and China have their own highly secret, laser weapons, they could direct at our fighter jets, bombers, and satellites, if they felt threatened by the US Military.

“We in the United States haven’t had a lot of [directed-energy weapons] programs for a while, [but] others around the world are still developing directed-energy weapons — Russia and China are the two big ones,” she said.

Very-high-energy weapons include laser systems, she added, and such weapons either would damage sensors on airplanes or satellites, or as technology evolves, physically destroy a platform in air or space.

The other important mission area for MSIC involves short-range ballistic missiles — those that can engage targets from tens of miles out to 600 miles out.

“These systems are important because they’re the weapon of choice for a lot of [nations] to reach beyond their borders, and they can be fitted to carry weapons of mass destruction, so they’re a big concern for us and our allies,” McCue said. “They’re certainly a big player in the Middle East and North Korea.”

The Obama Administration would be wise to choose a more prudent and conservative policy toward North Korea.

High tech weapons can play a major role on both sides, and there is only one way to truly find out which side has the best and most effective system, and that is by deploying them at a hostile force in anger.

Sixty years ago, the Korean War killed 54,000 Americans in a span of three years.  One short range nuclear strike could wipe out 8 million inhabitants in Seoul, within minutes.  Unless, our missile defense system could intercept it; but then that would invite a retaliatory response, which would then oblige China to return the favor against California.

The irony of it all is these highly advanced weapons systems, that require the most skilled engineers the planet could produce in this generation, if ever used, would revert any surviving humanity into cave dwellers.

Albert Einstein was heard to say, that he did know what super weapons would be used to fight WW 3, but quickly added that WW4 would be fought with clubs and stones.

More info:

http://www.dcmilitary.com/article/20130315/NEWS08/130319913/0/SEARCH

http://www.nknews.org/